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CNN: Is the ocean Florida’s untapped energy source?

Submitted onJuly 27, 2009 2 Comments, join the conversation
harness the ocean's current to power your house

harness the ocean's current to power your house

(CNN) — The answer to easing the energy crunch in one of the nation’s most populous states could lie underwater.

Story Highlights:

  • Scientists researching turbines that turn ocean currents into electricity
  • Turbines could generate power for up to 7 million homes in fuel-starved Florida
  • Project aims to develop 20-kilowatt underwater turbine by spring 2010
  • Scientists unsure how the technology would affect marine wildlife

Imagine if your utility company could harness the ocean’s current to power your house, cool your office, even charge your car.  Researchers at Florida Atlantic University are in the early stages of turning that idea into reality in the powerful Gulf Stream off the state’s eastern shore.

READ THE FULL ARTICLE HERE: http://tinyurl.com/l9rbcl

Sea turbines make electricity which moves via cable, left, to shore. A hydrogen by-product is collected on a ship.

Sea turbines make electricity which moves via cable, left, to shore. A hydrogen by-product is collected on a ship.

Researchers say turbines off Florida’s east coast could produce enough electricity to power 3 to 7 million homes.

Researchers say turbines off Florida’s east coast could produce enough electricity to power 3 to 7 million homes.

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2 Comments »

  • I needed to thank you for this good read!! I certainly loved every bit of
    it. I have you book marked to check out new stuff you post…

  • YHD says:

    We posted this article because of the immediate relevance to our industry. Florida boaters have been fighting off-shore drilling because of it’s potentially hazardous effects on our marine wildlife. While this turnbine proposal is clearly a greener energy option, we now must consider the effects on the migration patterns of our beloved aquatic friends. Much of this is in the experimental stage so we’ll have to hold judgment for a later time. We’ll be sure to update you as the plan develops.

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